Domino, Notes and videotape
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Ego giving a session at Engage

Ego giving a session at Engage

As I’m sure a lot of you know, I do a lot of presentations and lectures, as well as giving courses and doing user training. I’m especially doing a lot of this kind of work when it comes to collaboration and efficient use of email and calendar. If you want me to come and have a look at your organisation and make you less dependant on internal email, make it easier for your organisation to find information and documents and help you find the knowledge and skills that you have in house, please get in touch!

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I’m sometimes asked how you can be sure that something you have posted can only be seen for either friends, or for specific friends, and not by everyone who visits your profile. This is very easy to do.

  1. Open your Facebook profile
    .
  2. At the top, on your cover photo, to the right of your name, you’ll find this button, View as:
    View as
    .
  3. Click on it. You will now be viewing your Facebook profile as it’s shown to the general public, meaning people who’s a Facebook contact:
    View As pubic
    .
  4. You can also check what your profile looks like to a specific Facebook contact. Click on the View as Specific Person link in the black field above your cover photo:
    View as specific person
    .
  5. Start writing the name of the person you are searching for and click on said person’s name when it appears in the list:
    View as -search
    .
  6. Now you can see what this person will se if he or she opens up your profile:
    View profile as
    .
  7. To close this view and go back to your profile as yourself, click on the x to the left inside the black field:
    Close view as
    .
  8. Now you will be taken back to your own profile as yourself

When you are viewing your profile as a public person, or as someone else, you can also click on the views for friends, photos, information about yourself and anything located under the More button to see what they can see of your photos, videos, information and friends list:

View as - other views

 

If you want to check out what is public on your profile, this is a very nice way to do it. You can easily check what photos, information or other things you’ve posted that is completely open on Facebook. You can then go in and change these settings.

Was this tip useful? Any comments about it? Do you have any other requests about things I should show you? Please leave a comment below!

If you have your files in a cloud solution like Dropbox, Box, OneDrive, IBM Connections or Google Drive, you can connect Windows Explorer directly to these services. By doing this, you get direct access to your files from your Explorer window, as if they were stored locally on your computer. You can even access them while offline. Here are all the services I’m connected to:

Cloud services

 

PS: You can click on any of these images to see them in large versions if you want to see a more detailed view!

If I’m composing a new email in my web browser, like in Office 365, Gmail or IBM Verse, I can easily just take a file from any of these services, and drag them straight from Windows Explorer and into the email. Here I’m dragging a Dropbox file over as an attachment into a new email I’m composing in IBM Verse:

Drag from Dropbox to Verse

 

This works just as well in Gmail, Office 365 and most other web based mail services.

However, if I try to do this with a file in IBM Connections, it doesn’t work:

Drag and drop from Connections

 

Someone asked me about this a couple of weeks back, and I told him how you can get around this. Yes, you can drag and drop files in IBM Connections from Windows Explorer and straight into the email. To be able to do this, you must add the file to My Drive in Connections. Here’s how you do this:

  1. Find the IBM Connections file under My Files in Windows Explorer:
    My Files
  2. Right click on it and choose Add to My Drive:
    Add to my station
  3. A window showing you the synchronisation will pop up and then you will be told that the file has been added to My Drive. Click OK.
  4. Find My Drive in the left side menu of Explorer:
    My Drive in menu
  5. Find the file you just synced and simply drag it over to the email, and everything will work just fine:
    Drag into Verse

So you can achieve the same functionality with IBM Connections files, just as you can do with files from other cloud based services.

Note: Mac users will always be able to drag and drop directly into web based email services because they have to add their files to My Drive in order to be able to access them at all.

 

Ask Me About IBM Notes/Domino

August 26th, 2018 | Posted by elfworld in Domino | IBM - (0 Comments)

I’ve worked with IBM Notes/Domino (formerly known as Lotus Notes/Domino) since 1997. In those years, the death of Notes/Domino has been predicted so many times. But it hasn’t happened yet.
Now, don’t get me wrong, it could have been at better health than it has been for years.

But as I’ve written several times in this blog, a new initiative has been started, lead by HCL taking over the development of the platform. And they’ve got hundreds of people working on it.

In the past weeks I’ve been part of a group of people who have given input on the design of the user interface for IBM Notes v11, which most likely will appear next autumn. And it looks very promising.

However, there are plenty of new stuff coming for Domino v10 as well. I’ve summed that up in this blog posting. Check it out for all the goodies.

If you need need an expert on IBM Notes/Domino. Or if you want to know anything about the future of Notes/Domino v10 that is out in October. Or if you need a skilled Notes/Domino developer. Or if you need help with your licensing. Or maybe you want to webify your notes applications and make them available on cell phones and pads? Or do you simply want to make your native Notes applications look more modern and sexy?

We in Brainworker can help you. Please get in touch!

Look, I even got a certificate to prove it:

Here are 7 tips about your Facebook settings that you might not know about.

To get to any of these settings you have to click on the pulldown arrow to the right of the question mark at the top of your Facebook stream or page, and then choose Settings:

Facebook settings pulldown

This screen will now open up:

General FB settings

We are going to use the left side menu in this screen to gain access to all the 7 settings. You can click on all photos to see them in larger versions.

Also read: How to always see your Facebook Memories

Here are the 7 tips:

  1. How do people find you on Facebook?
    People can usually find you by searching for you, or maybe even Facebook suggests you as a friend for others. But you can exercise some control over this. In the left menu in Settings, go to Privacy and find the section called How People Find and Contact You:
    FB Privacy
    Here you can set who should be able to send you a friend request, if external search engines should be able to find you on Facebooks and how people can search and find you.
  2. Control who sees what on your timeline and who sees your tags?
    You can also control who should see what you post, and you can even control who should see postings you are tagged in. Go to Timeline and Tagging the left menu under Settings. There you will find all these settings:
    Timeline and tags
  3. Block anything you want
    Go to Blocking in the left side menu of Settings. You will now get a screen where you can do the following:
    – Put people on a Restricted list, which means you can keep people as friends, but hide all postings from them that you share with friends only
    – Block users, which means they are unfriended, can’t search for you, contact you, send you messages or see your profile
    – Block messages, you can stop users from sending you messages on Messenger. However, they will still be able to post on your profile, if you are friends
    – Block app invites, you can add friends who keeps sending you invites to apps to a list here
    – Block event invites, you can add friends you don’t want event invites from here
    – Block apps, here is where you add nametests.com and all other apps (let’s face it, all those apps are annoying)
    – Block pages, yup, you can even block entire Facebook pages
  4. Which language do you want?
    Go to Language in the left side menu of Settings. Here you can set the following:
    – What language should your Facebook be in
    – What language do you want postings in other languages to automatically be translated to and which languages you don’t want to translate
    – Set your postings to be posted in several languages at once
  5.  What should you be notified about?
    Yes, Facebook keeps coming up with new ways to annoy you with notifications. However, you can turn these on and off as you please via the Notifications menu in the left side menu of Settings:
    Notification settings
    On Facebook: here you can set in detail what sort of notifications that should pop up under the notification bell on Facebook. Do yourself a favour and go through this!
    Email: Turn on and off what notifications you want to receive emails from Facebook about
    Desktop and Mobile: Here you can control all the pop ups, buzzing and beeps you can get from Facebook, both on your cell phone and on your computer
    Text message: Turn on and off what sort of text  messages Facebook can send to your cell phone.
  6. What can the public see?
    Under Public Posts in the left side menu of Settings you can control who can follow your public posts (you can be followed by people who aren’t friends, unless you turn this off), comment on them, who can like or comment on public photos or profile info, if you want to have rankings on comments, your public Facebook name and if you want to connect a Twitter account to your Facebook (this means your postings will be posted on Twitter, with a link to your Facebook post).
  7. What does your Facebook profile look like?
    Have you ever wondered what your Facebook profile looks like to other people? Facebook has a really neat way to let you do this. Go to Public Posts in the left side menu of the Settings page:
    Public Posts
    At the bottom there is a link called Want to know what followers can see? View your public timeline:
    What can followers seeClick on this. Your profile will now open up, and you will be able to see how your profile looks for people who are not in your friends list:
    Public Profile
    At the top of your profile, above your Facebook profile photo you see this:
    Change profile v iewClick on this. A search field will now appear and you can search for any of your friends. Click on the name of the person you want to check and you will now see your profile just like that person will see it.

Also read: What happens to your Facebook profile when you die?

Did you like this tips? Do you want me to make tips about anything else on Facebook? Leave your comments below!

 

A real life story that happened to me with two different customers.

Once upon a time there two files. Each file was used in a different organisation. The files were important for the organisations and several people needed access to them as several departments and projects needed to be able access, update and read them.

The Microsoft customer

Office 365 appsIn the first organisation the file was created by a team manager who then uploaded it into a team room in Microsoft Teams. Everybody with access to the team room could now reach the file and work on it. However, they didn’t have version control, nor could they really set different permissions for different users of the team room.

Furthermore, other teams also wanted access to this file. But as long as they weren’t members of that particular team, they couldn’t reach the file. The solution was to upload a copy of each file to the other team rooms in Microsoft Teams. Each team got a different copy. The problem with that solution was everybody was now working on different files. This created a lot of confusion.

Finally they had to sit down and try to merge all the copies into one file, which took a hell of a lot of manual work. When the file was to everybody’s liking, they now uploaded it into Sharepoint. They could now add this Sharepoint file to several team rooms in Teams. They could also set permissions so that some teams could write to the file, while others could only read the file. But they could only set the permissions for the team room as a whole. They also had version control now.

However, the team members had a hard time understanding why the file wasn’t in their Teams files. They had to remember to go to the Sharepoint tab in Teams to get to the file. If they wanted to see the file revision and version control, or wanted to see who had done what to the file, they had to open the Sharepoint app. It was a lot of unnecessary work that made a lot of users rather grumpy and confused.

They also wanted to share the file outside of their organisation with a couple of business partners. This could be achieved via a guest account, but this wasn’t something they wanted to do. Instead they discovered that they could share the file externally via the Offie 365 apps, but only if you changed several permissions in the Sharepoint admin tool first. It was a lot of work and they ended up emailing the files to the external users. They then uploaded the edited file they got in return into Sharepoint, with all the pitfalls that came with such an approach.

What they did love though was the ability to let several people edit a document at the same time in their web browser. This worked beautifully, and they could have an online meeting where everybody was working on the same file, seeing the updates being made live. After saving, all the formatting in Office file was intact.

It was also very easy to access the file via Windows Explorer and to open it up in Office to work with it locally on their computer.

But as the number of Teams grew and people started using more and more of the many apps inside Office 365, it became more and more difficult to have the overview the workers needed to keep up to date. There was no singular newsfeed to keep people updated.

The IBM customer

IBM Connections LogoIn the second organisation the file was created by a team manager who then uploaded the file to his own profile in IBM Connections. He then shared the file with his team via the community the team had in IBM Connections. Now all the members of this community could both work with and read the file. They also had full version control and they could also set different permissions for different  community members.

Other teams also wanted access to this file. This was no problem. Since the original team leader had uploaded the file to his own profile, he could just share the file with any other community or other users directly. Everybody was  now working with the same file without any hazzle.

And even though the file really resided in the original team leaders profile, each community saw the file in the Files view of their community, as if the file was there. There was no need to look for other apps or tabs inside the community. To see who had done what to the file, and to have revision and version control, all they had to do was to to go to the file inside their community. All the details were there.

They also wanted to share the file outside of their organisation with a couple of business partners. This could be achieved via a guest account, but this wasn’t something they wanted to do. And since they didn’t want t to do that, there wasn’t much they could do, without buying a third party app like Box or similar. This was a major grievance for the organisation.

What they also wanted was to be able to let several people edit a document at the same time in their web browser. To be able to to this they had to buy IBM Docs as it doesn’t come out of the box in Connections. But they soon discovered that IBM Docs screwed up the formatting in the Office files, especially in Excel and Powerpoint. For Word documents, they got by.

However, it was very easy to access the file via Windows Explorer and to open it up in Office to work with it locally on their computer, something they were very happy with.

What the IBM customers also was very happy with was that no matter how many communities or how much functionality they used, everything was contained within the same user interface, the same program and the same newsfeed. You didn’t need to think about when to use what functions, everything was inside IBM Connections.

Conclusion

Microsoft’s Office 365 has great functionality when it comes to document editing and creating good and useful Office files. It’s also good for smaller collaboration teams. However, there are way too man apps and way too many possibilities, and despite this, it’s still very difficult to share information and files between these apps. Heck, it’s even hard to share information and files between different teams within the same application. For a large organisation, I would definitely think long and hard before I started using a lot of these apps, especially Teams. A Sharepoint site is better, but then you will have a lot of development costs in addition to the license. Unless you find a good Sharepoint template to use.

IBM Connections on the other hand works out of the box. There’s no development needed, unless you want to of course. It’s also very easy to share information and files across the organisation and the various applications inside Connections. The users are thinking of Connections as one app, unlike Office 365 where you have to deal with many apps. This latter so confusing that Microsoft has made an 85 (eighty five!) page manual to tell you when to use what app…

Bot solutions have the ability to create guest accounts so that you can invite external users. But where Connections can’t share files outside the organisation out of the box, Office 365 actually can.

Both solutions makes it seamless to work with files directly from your local PC and from your email.

So both have their strengths and weaknesses, but I find Connections to have the upper hand when it comes to social collaboration and it has a lower learning curve when it comes to working effectively with it as a collaborative tool across the silos of your organisation. Office 365 still encourages silos.

However, if all you want to do is work with files and not much else, Office 365 is the way to go. And: You can actually work with Office 365 files from Connections. Something you cannot do the other way around.

Any thoughts, questions or comments? Use the comment fields below!

 

One of the things I like about  Facebook is that it can show you what you posted on this particular date all the way back to the year when you joined. Facebook is often showing you this functionality in your newsstream:

Facebook Memories

Under the memory itself, you can click on See More Memories to see all the memories for this particular date.

Some days you don’t get to see this memories reminder in your feed. But there is still a way for you to see all of your memories for today.

Simply add an /onthisday after facebook.com in the url in your browser. So the adress will then be: www.facebook.com/onthisday

If you are on your cell phone, simply open your web browser there and write m.facebook.com/onthisday:

On this Day mobile

There you go! See your memories whenever you want.

Please leave your comments and tell me what you think of this (and other) tips for to give any other feedback.

Did you read these Facebook tips?

 

Yes featuring ARW

It was when vocalist Jon Anderson gave his all at the beginning of the last section of “Heart of the Sunrise” that the hairs on the back of my neck were higher up than a Republican’s hackles if you mention Hillary Clinton.

I had chills running down my spine, and it wasn’t because the guy behind me had poured the ice cubes from his drink down my back (they had melted a long time ago and the water was now mixed in with my sweat). The stage was flooded with light from the spotlights, and I saw that the almost sold out concert venue Sentrum Scene in Oslo were having the exact same experience as me. “Love comes to you, and you foloooooooow” Anderson sang, and I realised I could either have an orgasm or start crying. I chose the latter…

But which Yes was on stage this evening? Don’t worry. If you are uninitiated, I’m not even going to attempt to explain the complicated story of exactly who is or isn’t a member of Yes at any given moment. Let’s just say that it’s complicated. I mean, really complicated. Just take my word for it, ok?

Jon AndersonIt’s so complicated that these days there are two versions of Yes currently on their 50th anniversary tours. I saw the other Yes this Easter during the 50th anniversary celebrations at the London Palladium. Said band has no original members left after bassist Chris Squire died. Still, they are the ones named just Yes, and they also are in possession of the rights to the famous Yes logo.

The band playing at Sentrum Scene in the Norwegian capital this evening, on the other hand, has Yes founder Jon Anderson as their leader and vocalist. His voice, and name, are what everybody thinks of when identifying Yes. With him he as guitarist Trevor Rabin, who came into the band in 1983 and gave the band their comeback hit “Owner of a Lonely Heart.”

Third man out is keyboardist Rick Wakeman, who’s been in and out of Yes so many times that I ran out of fingers trying to count them. However, say “Yes” and “keyboardist” in the same sentence, and most people will say “Rick Wakeman.” He’s also had a solo career that resulted him selling more records than Yes ever did.

The last time I saw Yes on Norwegian ground it was the other Yes, with Benoit David on vocals. That was an unmitigated disaster of the biggest proportions. David sang so out of tune that a dead hamster buried in the basement of a 30 storey house under a ton of bricks would have tried to get away. And people left the concert in droves.

Trevor RabinHowever, with Wakeman and Anderson on the bill, it seemed that Norwegian Yes fans were willing to give this version of Yes a chance. I was also pleased to see so many young faces there, even if I was below the medium age in the room. But it didn’t really matter, because the band was welcomed with arms that were more open than a Scotsman being told he will be paid in cash. And it’s been a long time since I saw that many people at this particular venue.

The concert started with the instrumental “Cinema” from the album “90125,” before we jumped into “Hold On” from the same album. Then it was straight back to the 70s to perform “South Side of the Sky,” a song Yes almost never played in their 70s heyday. We stayed in that decade to be served one of Yes’ most famous songs, “I’ve Seen All Good People” (- For all the good people of Oslo, as Anderson said).

And so it went. We were in the 70s (“And you and I,” “Perpetual Change,” “Heart of the Sunrise” and “Awaken), with the occasional trip to the 80s (“Changes,” “Rhythm of Love” and “Owner of a Lonely Heart.”) At one point we even visited 1994 and the album “Talk” through the song “I am Waiting.”

Rick WakemanWakeman was in character in a long glittering cape going all the way from his shoulders to the floor (you get away with that sort of thing if your name is Rick Wakeman). His fingers were dancing over the keys like they were made of air. All the soup diets he’s constantly tweeting about didn’t seem to have had much effect, but my oh my how he played. It wasn’t quite up there where it used to be, but my music teacher in middle school would have given him a A-. At least!

And then it’s Jon Anderson. The man who was described as “slightly to the right of Hitler,” by original drummer Bill Bruford, when it came to the treatment of his bandmates… Anderson is 73 years old, and even if his voice isn’t as flawless as it used to be, I know quite a few aging rock vocalists who are green with envy when they hear what Jon Anderson is still able to pull off, vocally. (A certain other Anderson, who’s first name starts with I, I’m looking at you!)

Rabin is a few years younger than Wakeman and Anderson, but he is the one who has been seeing a plastic surgeon on a regular basis, as well as getting lots of hair transplants. He looked like a cross between Ray Monroe in Twin Peaks, Michael Jackson and Little Richard. Still, he’s a great guitarist and I didn’t mind the rearrangements he did of some of the 70s material.

Drummer Lou Molino III played the drums and percussion just brilliantly, and bassist Lee Pomeroy got to play around with “Heart of the Sunrise,” where the entire opening riff is carried by the bass. However, for a band that was started by one of the most brilliant, and original, bass players of all time, Chris Squire, it’s just plain wrong to hide the bass in the mix the way they are doing on this tour. Stop it!

The concert also lasted for just over two hours, way too short for a Yes concert!

But that is just nitpicking when you think back on such magic moments like “Awaken,” where harp, church organ and Jon’s cosmic lyrics made you fly so high that you wondered if you had consumed other remedies than just beer that night. The version they did of “Owner of a Lonely Heart” was also fantastic. Especially the incredible jam session they did towards the end, including a keytar solo.

And when the whole thing was concluded with an encore consisting of a flaming version of “Roundabout,” we all could just dance (or at least as close to a dance as a stiff and aging body is able to) out in the summer warm Oslo, knowing full well we had just seen “all good people.”

Please come back soon, Yes featuring ARW. I am waiting! I am ready!

Yes feafuring ARW and audience

Ego in session

Photo: Kristoff Bruers

As I wrote in this blog posting, IBM and HCL presented what was new and upcoming in IBM Notes and Domino v10 and 11 at the Engage conference at the end of May. Domino is the server, which they now hope to people will start using as an open development platform with the help of technology like Dokker and Node.Js. Notes is the client, where users traditionally have used the applications developed on the Domino platform, as well as using the email and calendar features the client offers.

They also announced new functionality for the Notes client, but I was very disappointed that there won’t be a new user interface in v10. Instead, HCL and IBM are going with the same design that the six-year-old v9 already has. But on the other hand, what future does the Notes client really have?

In this day and age, a heavy client is not something you want to have to deal with. I have great love for the Notes client, and I’ve defended it against haters several times. Yes, it can be cumbersome to administrate, but the Notes client has an undeserved bad reputation.

Read the rest of the article.

I’ve Seen All Good People

May 31st, 2018 | Posted by elfworld in Journalism | Music - (5 Comments)
Yes

Yes on stage at the London Palladium. Orginal drummer Bill Bruford introduced the band and joked he was the original member on stage that night.

An English translation of my story from  the 50th Yes anniversary fan convention at the London Palladium

Roger Dean signing

Jonathan Grierson is only nine years old, but a huge Yes fan. – I’ve been a Yes fan for several years, the young man told us. And Yes cover artist Roger Dean was more than happy to sign the 50th anniversary Yes book for Mr. Grierson.

– I’ve been a fan since I was very young. The comment from Jonathan Grierson shouldn’t surprise me. After all, we are at the London Palladium at a fan convention to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Yes. And even if the average age of the convention participants is pretty high, a lot of the fans weren’t even born when the band started out. Yours truly was born four days after the band’s fifth album, the artistic peak of the band, Close to the Edge was released.

The recruit

No, what surprises me is that Jonathan is 9 years old! And I have just witnessed him getting the autograph of Roger Dean, Yes’ legendary cover artist.

– I listen to Yes a lot, I was introduced to them via 90125, says Jonathan. – At night I always have a radio on, I listen to Planet Rock a lot and I’m also a great fan of Queen. But at my school I don’t think anyone has ever heard of Yes. It’s kind of cool to like something the others don’t. And my friends would think it is bad music. But I listen to a variety of music. Nothing modern, though.

His mom, Melanie Grierson has been a fan for over 30 years and admits her son was kind of force fed Yes growing up. She attended the Yes concert the night before the fan convention but thought it was a bit late in the evening for a nine year old to be up. So Jonathan will have to wait a bit longer for his first Yes gig but it’s good to see that the recruitment of new Yes fans is still going on.

Charity

Yes collection

David Watkinson has collected Yes memoribilia for over 40 years. During the charity Yes fan convention at the London Palladium March 24th he put parts of it on display.

However, the fan convention is by no means a bad consolation price. It was organised by Yes memorabilia collector extraordinaire, David Watkinson and Brian Neeson, the founder of Scottish Yes Network. The event is sponsored by PROG, and editor Jerry Ewing was hosting and doing Q&As on stage during the day. Tribute bands SeyYes and Fragile were also performing. Everything was done in cooperation with Yes and their management.

Yes also played two gigs at London Palladium the same weekend. Both nights Trevor Horn did a guest spot on vocals on during Tempus Fugit from the Drama album. Horn was the lead vocalist on that album in 1980. He also produced their two other albums in the 80s (90125 and Big Generator) as well as their 2011 album Fly From Here. During the convention Yes also released a remixed version of Fly From Here, with Horn on lead vocals.

The profits from the convention will go the Christie Hospital in Manchester and the organisation Kangaroos, that works with children with special needs. And with over 500 fans, from all over the world attending, quite a lot of money came in.

Jerry from PROG

Host and PROG editor Jerry Ewing is delighted when I tell him about the 9 year old Yes fan. Ewing is friends with members of both bands touring as Yes at the moment (see further down for details) and was asked by their management to be host.

– It’s one of my favourite bands, so I said yes. It’s also safe to say that without Yes, neither Prog nor Classic Rock Magazine, would have been started by me. They are the one of the quintessential prog band, no doubts about it. And even if I know most about the band’s history, I have to take into account that people in the audience don’t. So, I have to ask questions accordingly during the Q&As.

Ewing lead several panels, one with Roger Dean and the authors of various Yes books. And later on in the day, he lead the Q&A with the whole band. Nothing Earth shattering came out of the Q&A, but the band looked be in good spirits. And vocalist Jon Davis, currently in his 7th year as their singer, admitted it was a dream come true to be in Yes.

The collector

David Watkinson

David Watkinson has collected Yes memoribilia for over 40 years. During the charity Yes fan convention at the London Palladium March 24th he put parts of it on display.

The convention was spread over two floors at London Palladium. Downstairs was the bar and the concert venue. Upstairs was a wonderful exhibition of Yes memorabilia, courtesy of David Watkinson, author of the book Yes: Perpetual Change. One of the most popular items to take selfies with was the reproduction of the mannequin head from the cover of The Yes Album (1971).

But those who took the time to have a closer look at the framed newspaper clippings, got to see a lot of band history and trivia, written back when it actually happened. This is a refreshing change from reading modern day biographies that are written with the huge benefit of hindsight.

– I’ve collected for 40 years, says Watkinson. – And in the pre-Internet days, that involved writing letters, sending faxes to Japanese collectors and to America and so on. It could take months from you had tracked a collectable down until you had it in the post.

The podcaster

Another one who was delighted to be at the convention was Kevin Mulryne. He is one of the hosts of the Yes Music podcast. Over the last seven years, Kevin and Mark Anthony K from Canada (– I’ve never met him, says Kevin), have made over 300 podcasts where they are discussing Yes’ career and doing interviews with Yes members and others. You can check them out yesmusicpodcast.com. Currently they are going through all of Yes’ singles.

– We have met so many Yes fans here today who listen to the podcast, and that has been very nice, said Mulryne.

Personally I started listening to the podcast after speaking to Mulryne, and I have to say that I’m seriously impressed with how good Mulryne is in front of a microphone. I’ve worked in radio myself for years, and that is a good radio voice. And he never ever messes up any words.

The writer

Lars Garde

Norwegian Yes fan Lars Garde had stopped in London on his way back home from the US just to attend the fan convention. – It’s been a great experience he said. And he was fortunate enough to bump into Steve Howe to get an autograph too.

The new version of Fly from Here wasn’t the only thing launched at the convention. Simon Barrow is out with a new book, Solid Mental Grace: Listening to the Music of Yes. He’s a professional writer, who also happens to be a Yes fan.

– It’s about how you can tell a story about Yes from the music, rather than through the personnel changes and soap opera surrounding the music business.

The book seems to have struck a nerve, because he ran out of copies and had to jot down names and addresses of people who wanted a copy of the book.

The painter

During the entire convention, there was a constant line of people waiting for Roger Dean to sign books, pieces of art and of course album covers. There was also a lot of his artwork on display and to be bought.

– I think I have signed around 400 items today, he tells me after the whole thing is over.

We are just about to have a small chat when a record company representative comes over to talk about some problems surrounding a new Yes box set Dean has done the artwork for. (The problems referred to here ended up in the entire box set, which was curated by Jon Anderson from the other Yes band touring these days, being cancelled -Hogne).

– There are always some complications, he tells me afterwards. – I remember when I came to Yes with my cover ideas for Going for the One in 1977. Vocalist Jon Anderson was painting pictures, pointed at them and told me that this was what he was after. And I basically said no. So, I didn’t make the cover for that album, even if they kept the Yes logo. Although if it’s been a bit on and off, my relationship with Yes has been going on for at least 45 years, give or take.

Two Yes-es

London Palladium

The London Palladium is a beautiful venue and over 500 people came to the Yes fan convention. The upper floor was at times very crowded because the line to Roer Dean’s signing table.

On and off relationships like that are something Yes is known for. There has been a ludicrous amount of lineup changes, and the band celebrating this weekend has no original members left, after bassist Chris Squire sadly died a few years back. The current lineup is Steve Howe (guitars), Billy Sherwood (bass), Geoff Downes (keyboards), Alan White (drums) and Jon Davison (vocals). Steve Howe and Alan White, have been an integral part of Yes for most of their career, and Howe is these days in charge.

However, there is also another Yes in existence. They consist of Yes founder Jon Anderson, their most famous keyboard player Rick Wakemand and guitarist Trevor Rabin, who saved the band in the 80s. Under the monicker Yes featuring ARW they are currently touring the world, playing Yes music. None of them were at the convenion, a fact that drummer Bill Bruford pointed out when he introduced Sunday night’s gig, by stating he was the only original member present that evening… Jon Anderson was invited to the event, but he had commitments that prevented him from being able to come.

– I would call it the nature of the beast, says Jerry Ewing about this situation. – It’s the music business. But as a fan I have to say that I’m happy to see two bands playing Yes music. It’s the best of both worlds.

All other Yes fans I talk to at the convention agrees. But podcaster Kevin Mulryne adds:

– I think Yes featuring ARW is hiding the bass in the background at the concerts. Chris Squire’s bass playing was an integral part of the Yes sound. So, pump up the bass!

Standing ovation

Yes are given a standing ovation after the end of the concert at London Palladium, where the band and fans gathered to celelbrate the band’s 50th anniversary.