Domino, Notes and videotape
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Security and settings

Another security scandal at Facebook. My, how the week has flown. Yesterday it was revealed that Facebook has, once again, tried to cover up a security scandal. And this one is just inexcusable. Change your password immediately. This is how you do it!

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Email from Facebook

Sometimes you can become too suspicious when you receive an email about a security breach in one of your many online or social media accounts. I thought that two emails I received from Facebook were phishing attempts. Turns out they were genuine. This is how you can check whether an email from Facebook is genuine or not!

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Aunt May

In the past few days there have been numerous postings and articles in presumptive serious magazines and tech blogs that claim if you are posting a photo of what you looked like ten years ago, and what you look like today, it will make you vulnerable when it  comes to what Facebook knows about you. It’s not any more dangerous than what Facebook already knows about you. And they know a LOT! Let me show you exactly how much.

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Fake friend requests

I’m sure you’ve received them too. Friend requests from sexy bikini clad women who suddenly wants to be your friend. Or maybe you’ve received a friend request from a smiling man from Nigeria, who desperately wants to be your friend, so that you can help him with some money transfers? 

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Paaaartyyyyy! Domino Forever!

October 24th, 2018 | Posted by elfworld in Domino | IBM | ISBG - (1 Comments)

Yellow party

The superlatives and positive messages about the Norwegian user group’s (ISBG) launch of IBM/Notes Domino V10 in Norway yesterday has been pouring in all morning. As the leader of ISBG, this makes me immensely happy. And it gives bright hope for the future, and we will use this momentum when we’ve now started preparing for the spring seminar. Read on to see what happened at the launch!

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Last Friday 50 million Facebook users woke up and discovered that they had been logged out of Facebook. Not just one place, but on their computer, cellphone, the Messengar app and on all devices where they had used Facebook as their logon method. Facebook is saying that there’s no need for their users to do anything. Don’t listen to Facebook! Change your password now!

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GDPRI’m sure you have received them too. Tons of annoying emails where companies or organisations are explaining to you how they value your privacy, and that because of the new GDPR directive from the EU, they are asking for your consent to continue sending you emails.

Yes, there is a new directive that will soon be put into action. The original date was on May 25th, but it’s now been postponed until June. However there was most likely no need for the company to send you an email asking for your consent. In fact, these emails are most likely illegal and a violation of both GDPR and privacy rules that already are in effect!

In an article in the Guardian,  Toni Vitale, the head of regulation, data and information at the law firm Winckworth Sherwood, says that businesses are not required to ask for your consent. They already have your consent because of the existing 1998 Act, which was made in preparation for GDPR.

Also: Consent is just one of the six legal grounds under GDPR. The others are contract, legal obligation, vital interests, public interest and legitimate interests.

In addition, recital 171 of the GDPR makes it clear that you can continue to rely on any existing consent that they already had from you, which you gave them by signing up in the first place. There is absolutely no reason to ask for your consent again. All an organisation has to do is to make sure the consent met the GDPR standard, and that they are properly documented.

In short: You have received tons of unnecessary annoying emails for no reason other than a lot of consultants wanted to make a shitload of money by preying on the misguided fear that companies could be fined insane amounts of money. Naturally these companies wanted to cover their asses.

Not only that, but by emailing you these GDPR emails, the sender will most likely be breaching the rules set by the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations, which makes it an offense to email someone to ask them for consent to send them marketing  by email!

To quote Vitale: “If the business really does lack the necessary consent to communicate with you, it probably lacks the consent even to email you to ask you to give it that consent.”

On the positive side, if you just ignore these emails and don’t click on any of the links in them, you will not receive more annoying marketing emails from the companies that sent them to you…

Microsoft scamYesterday I got another «Hi, this is Fucker Fuckerson from Microsoft Security calling” call. They had even managed to fake a Norwegian cell phone number this time, which is the only reason I replied. (I never reply to call from abroad anymore. If people outside of Norway wants to get hold of me, they have to send me an email, or message me via one of the many online services I’m on. Once I was called from abroad and they asked “Is this Hogne?” Unfortunately, I replied “yes” and they recorded it and used it as a verification that I had said yes to a lot of services, which I was then was charged for via my phone bill).

However, back to yesterday: I realised it was a fake call when he said he was from Miscrosoft (remember, Microsoft would never ever make an unsolicited call to tell you that your computer is infected). Unfortunately for him I was in a bad mood for other reasons already, so I decided to hurt the fucker. Here’s what I did:

I played along. After he told me my computer was infected, I went “oh no” and confirmed that I would sit down at my computer and let him connect to my computer and help me fix it. What I instead did was sitting down with my trusty old Imac and I started looking through my sound effects library for one particular sound.

You see, I make movies and radio programs, so I have an extensive library of great sound effects. A lot of those are made by yours truly. I was looking for a sound that is a combination of an old modem, a Norwegian civil defence siren (with a higher pitch than usual), a dentist drill sound and nails being scraped along a school chalk board. In short: Sounds that really hurt the ear.

I found the sound, loaded it into my music player, turned the volume of my subwoofer powered speakers to 9, put on my noise cancelling head phones for protection, held the phone as close to my speakers as I could, and turned the sound on.

Even with my noise cancelling headphones my ears hurt. But it didn’t matter. The scream I heard coming from the other end of the phone line was worth it.

Update 18.01.2019: This article is now out of date. Facebook has changed how you download your data. Read this updated article instead.

In these days where Facebook is rocked by the Cambrigde Analytica scandal, more and more people are starting to wake up and reliase how much personal information they are actually giving Facebook. Especially now that Facebook is showing that not only are they not that concerned about protecting your data, they are now even trying to cover their tracks by almost lying about why they shared so much data to third parties.

But do you know exactly what Facebook knows about you? Do you want to find out? It’s very easy.

  1. Go to the pull down menu next to the help button (?):
    Pulldown
  2. Click on it:
    Pulldown
  3. Find the item Settings and click on it:
    Settiings
  4. General Settings will now open up. At the bottom of the list, in small writing, you will find a link called Download a copy of your Facebook data:
    Download a copy
  5. Click on this link. You will now see this page:
    Download
  6. Click on Start My Archive
  7. You will be prompted for your password. Type it in and click Submit
  8. You will then get the following message:
    Start request
  9. Click on Start My Archive
  10. You will now be told that Facebook has started to create your archive, and that you will receive an email to the displayed email adress when the archive is finished.
  11. Click OK
  12. You will now receive an email from Facebook telling you that they have received your request, and that they will send you a new email when your data is ready for download
  13. Go on using Facebook as normal, while waiting for the email from them. This might take a while!
  14. When your Facebook data is ready for download you will get both an email and a notification in Facebook. Click on the link, and you will be taken to this page:
    Download
  15. Click on Download Archive
  16. You will be prompted for your password again. Type it in and click Submit
  17. A zip-file with your data will now be downloaded. Choose where you want to save it. If your browser doesn’t ask you where you want to save it, you will find it in the Downloads/Nedlastinger folder.
  18. Find the file on your computer. The file will be called facebook-[yourname].zip
  19. Doubleclick on it. The file will now open up and show you the contents:
    ZIP
  20. Mark the index file and all the folders by clicking on them while holding down the CTRL key on your keyboard:
    Marked Files
  21. Hold down the CTRL key on your keyboard while hitting the letter C on your keyboard. Alle the files and folders will now be copied.
  22. Go to the My Documents/Documents/Mine dokumenter/Dokumenter folder, right click on it and then click Paste/Lim inn:
    Paste
  23. The index file and all the folders will now be pasted in there. Wait for it to finish copying, it will take a while.
  24. When it has finished copying, double click on the index file.
  25. A web page will now open in your web browser. And you can see
  26. You can now click on the links in the web page’s menu to see exactly what Facebook knows about you, and what you have shared and uploaded.

You can se EVERYTHING you have done on Facebook.

Here’s what I found by going through my own data:

  • The names, numbers, email and adresses of all my phone contacts that I had on my phone up until I removed Messenger from the phone
  • A list of every single call I received or made between 2008 and 2016. The list even told me if the call was a missed call or not
  • A list of every single text message and MMS I sent and received in the same period
  • Every single conversation I’ve ever had on Messenger, even from people how have blocked me or that I have blocked
  • All my interests and pages that I have liked
  • Every single comment and like I have made
  • Every single comment and like YOU have made on my postings
  • Every single song I’ve listened to on Spotify in the period I used Facebook to log on to Spotify
  • Surprisingly few of my photos, but the ones that were there had all comments and likes listed
  • Most videos and live broadcasts, including comments and likes
  • A list of all Facebook friends, including the ones I no longer have in my friends list
  • Every single event that I have created or attended
  • Every single place or device I used to log on to Facebook
  • Every ad I’ve made or (accidentally) clicked, including sponsored postings
  • Every single application I’ve ever used

Imagine having this information for billions of users all over the world. Now, imagine people using stupid Facebook quizzes that give these quiz apps the same access to all of your friends’ data.   The next time people ask you why you should care about privacy, tell them this:

All this data is a total profile on you. And it’s a profile about your beliefs, your political views, your sexual orientation, who your friends are, what you like, what you don’t like… It’s so much, that the people who have all this knowledge about you can actually use it to influence you on what to vote, what to think and even how you behave!

Lately there have been more and more focus on exactly what the Facebook and Messenger apps are doing on your phone. And the revelations have been quite an eye opener for a lot of people. There is no logical reason for Facebook reading your phone contacts list, your text messages or any other content on your phone.

Especially Android users have been affected by this, because on the Iphone there are more restrictions.

However, I’m going to show you how you can use Facebook and Messenger on your phone without having to worry about the Facebook corporation accessing anything on your phone:

  1. If you have the Facebook and Messenger apps installed on your phone, uninstall them now
  2. Open your phone’s web browser (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Opera Mini etc)
  3. Go to this adress: https://mbasic.facebook.com/
  4. Log in to your Facebook account. If your web browser asks you for permission to give you notifications, you can safely accept.
  5. You will now see the basic version of Facebook:
    FB Basic
  6. Click on the browser’s menu button and choose Add to homescreen:
    How to Geek
  7. An icon will now be placed on your home screen on your phone:
    Icons
  8. Use this icon to open and browse Facebook.

That’s it. Now you can use Facebook and Messenger without having to worry about giving away your data or information about your cell phone contacts and text messages.

Be warned thought, that the basic version of Facebook is just that: Basic. Most of the functionality will be there, but it’s a bit more cumbersome to use. But after a while, you get used to it.